Code Review Revisited or research - the teacher version

Last semester I wrote about how I was introducing my students to code review. I thought it worked pretty well and was anxious to try it again. Well, I did the lesson(s) again this past week and it looks like it's a keeper. The setup was pretty much the same with some hiccups due to using a new platform. Last semester I used plain GitHub public repos. This time, I've been using GitHub classroom which I like very much but I forgot that I made this assignment use private repos which turned out to be a hassle.
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CS Teacher PD at Grow with Google

Yesterday we held our third monthle Professional Development session for teachers of "APCS-A, Similar, and Beyond." It's great to see that we're starting to form a core of a community of CS teachers teaching some of the more advanced classes as there is a core group that keeps coming back for more. Even better is the fact that we're gaining a couple of new teachers at each session. Last time, we were at Digital Ocean, a cloud provide that has been very involved in education since their creation and has been a tremendous boon to my education projects over the years.
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Implicit Curricula

The state got back to us the other week on our CSEd programs. Still no approval. One of the requirements is that we have 12 graduate CS credits in our program and that in those courses these five major areas: Algorithms and programming Computing systems Data and analysis Impacts of computing Networks and the internet as described in the K12 CS Framework. Even though many of the items described in the framework fit better in an education side course NY is requiring that it's all covered in CS courses offered by a CS department.
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Using Emacs 57 Dired Narrow

One of Emacs power features that I've never quite gotten into is dired, the Directory Editor. I've already done a video on the package. It's really cool and I do use it at times but I still haven't started using it for my day to day. Well, I just started using a couple of packages that might change this. They're part of a set of dired addons that you can check out at the dired hacks page.
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Busy Week

I'm glad it's Saturday morning. It's been a busy week. It looks like there's a couple more to plough through but hopefully then I can catch my breath over spring break. Why so busy? It's the same old story - you've got all those projects that you're waiting on and everything comes in at the same time. To start off, it's college decision season. The high school seniors all know their options and are deciding where to go.
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Choosing A Textbook

Now and again there are requests on the assorted CS Education forums asking about which text book to use. These requests are usually for APCS-A. There are usually a number of "I'm very happy with ..." replies but I thought I'd take a bit of a deeper dive into what teachers might want to consider when evaluating a textbook. It was never an issue when I started as a math teacher.
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Adapting A Nifty Assignment

The Nifty Assignments session at SGICSE is always a popular one. Go to the site and you'll find links to all the assignments presented from 1999 to the present year. On the one hand, it's a great resource. On the other, the assignments vary in nifty-ness depending on one's personal taste. To me, there seemed to be a run of nifty assignments that were really just "take a generic assignment and fancy up the graphics"
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New Monitor

Got a new monitor today and wanted to share. My old one was a 27" Hanns G. Actually, the old ones - my old set up was 2 of them side by side. When I started at Hunter, I was given a piddly small monitor so I tried to buy my own 27" Hanns G to bring in but they were no longer available. The 27" jobs available then were much more expensive so my work monitor situation has been sadly lacking.
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Evaluating Java IDES for teaching teachers.

Since Hunter uses C++ as it's core language, I haven't used Java much in the past three years. That's going to change pretty soon. Once we start offering our CS teacher Certificate and Masters programs I'll once again start teaching with Java as that's one of the langauges that we want to prepare our teachers with. That means deciding on a set of tools and so I've been spending time evaluating Java programming environments with an eye on the beginner since not only do the teachers I work with have to be comfortable with the tool but more importantly they will have to be able to support the tool for all of their students.
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SIGCSE 2019 - the keynotes

It's that time of the year to write a series of blog posts about SIGCSE. I thought I'd start with one on the keynotes. There were four keynote speakers. Marie desJardins, Gloria Townsend, Mark Guzdial, and Blair Taylor. I wasn't at the first timer's lunch where Townsend spoke so I won't talk at all about that keynote. I'm also not going to summarize the talks. Andy Ko wrote up a terrific summary of his SIGCSE experience and did a much better job giving overviews to the keynotes than I ever could so I'll just refer you to Andy's blog post.
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