Advent of Code

Advent 2019 Day - 8

I spent most of last week up in Albany working on the NY State K12 CS Standards so fell a bit behind. I had to go back to complete day 5 but still haven't finished day 7 which builds on day 5 which in turn builds on day 2. I might not get to finishing 7 for a while but it looks like a good chance to play with core.async - Clojure's facilities for concurrency.
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Advent 2019 Day 4

Day 4. Most of the day was spent working on the NY State CS standards to I didn't figure to have much time to work on the problem. Fortunately, I was able to knock out part 1 before work started and part 2 was a quick adjustment when I got back to it at the start of lunch. Once again, it was a problem with a few interesting teacher side aspects.
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Advent 2019 Day 3

Today's problem dealt with intersecting paths. You start with two inputs, figure out the paths they represent and where they intersect and then find the intersection that correctly answers the question. For part 1 you have to find the intersection closest to the origin. From a teacher's point of view, the interesting part here is data representation. This problem deals with a two dimensional grid on which the paths live. For most students, at least in my experience, if they're trained in a language like C++ or Java they go for the direct representation - a 2D array.
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Advent 2019 Day 2

Day 2 of Advent of Code 2019 was also pretty straightforward and once again I wrote my solution in Clojure but in order to talk about this from a teacher's point of view, we'll look at a Python solution. At its core, this is a simulation problem - read the data into an array or list and write a program to run through the steps. At first I was hoping that the solution would consume the data - that is, once you read past an instruction you don't go back to it.
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Advent of Code 2019 Day 1

Like most programming challenges, Advent of Code ramps out from easier, more accessible problems to harder, more complex ones. As such, a number of the early challenges are great problems for early CS students. I thought that while I watched my NY Giants play valiantly in their attempt to get a high draft pick I'd talk about today's challenge from a teacher's point of view. The summary of part one is that you have a list of inputs (masses of components) and for each one you have to perform a calculation (how much fuel is needed).
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